Your Elevator Ride Is About to Be Improved

Your Elevator Ride Is About to Be Improved

Except for in the event of getting stuck, we rarely take the time to consider the power of the elevator. Well, as skylines begin to expand and buildings continue to rise, we need to focus on the one element that is central to the success of a building - the elevator.

Approximately 14 million elevators are currently in service worldwide and according to the National Elevator Industry Inc., approximately 18 billion elevator trips occur annually in the United States. The number of elevator trips taken will only continue to increase as our population will rise to an estimated 2.5 billion people by the year 2020.

image © Ammar shaker

image © Ammar shaker

While the majority of skyscrapers will continue to use standard elevator services, the forthcoming Jeddah Tower which is claiming the position of the world’s tallest building when it’s finished, will be using Tytyri’s UltraRope technology.

 
 

The UltraRope technology uses lightweight carbon-fiber straps which are 90% lighter than the coiled-steel ropes traditionally used in elevator systems. Since the carbon-fiber straps are lighter, they reduce the amount of weight in the building. This is particularly of interest for the skyscrapers that are reaching to claim the title of being the tallest as weight bearing loads can create complications.

image © Max Pixel

image © Max Pixel

In addition to focusing on reducing weight, elevator companies are also considering ways to make the elevator ride a more pleasant experience for users. This includes pressurizing the elevator cab, streaming music, implementing soft lighting, and accelerating and decelerating at an appropriate speed.

While we currently rush to get in and out of elevators, with these changes it seems like soon we won't be able to wait for our next ride.


Source: Curbed

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